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65% of those in Germany get too little daylight in the winter

Facts

The long dark days have an impact on the mind, and daylight is more important than ever.

Hamburg, November 2017. Winter is not the most popular of seasons in Germany. A study undertaken on behalf of Velux in December 2016 showed: The thing people miss the most people at this time of the year is daylight. So as to effectively counteract the bad vibes, it's all the more important to utilise the little daylight there is, and to design spaces to be as bright as possible.

When the temperatures fall in winter and the days grow shorter, our mood also takes a turn for the worse. But it’s not the cold which is the biggest problem: According to a December 2016 study conducted by the market research institute Kantar Emnid, on behalf of skylight manufacturer Velux, most Germans are bothered by a lack of daylight. 65% of respondents cited this point – way ahead of “low temperatures” (29%) and “thick clothes” (27%).


Too little daylight depresses one’s mood

By no later than January, looking out of your house at the grey weather worsens your mood, and the longing for sunshine intensifies. Daylight should not be underestimated as a factor of happiness. It has a unique blend of different colours, and thus promotes the formation of the “happy” hormone, serotonin: Our mood improves. Long periods of darkness can cause tiredness and bad moods. In the worse-case scenario, winter depression may occur, which has to be treated with light therapy. A better option here to guard against the winter months is by ensuring that the living areas in your house have sufficient daylight.


More light at home

The light intensity of an overcast sky is still three to four times as high as average room lighting. Which is why it’s all the more important to ensure that as much daylight as possible reaches your own four walls, where you of course spend more time in winter than in summer. Large windows are the best solution for this. If it's an attic room, Velux skylights in the sloped part of the roof can mean even more daylight coming into the rooms, as the incidence of light there is up to three times higher than for facade windows. In kids’ bedrooms, studies or living rooms on the floor just below the roof, they cause large amounts of daylight in particular to flood in, thus positively impacting the mood. So as to optimally support this effect occurring with large-scale window-based solutions, manufacturers such as Velux offer special lighting solutions, ranging from: a row of windows; an extension of the skylight in the form of a fixed-glazed additional element down to the ground; the combination of several skylights next to each other; through to a panorama solution similar to a dormer. In this last case, those using the attic room benefit now only from significantly more sunlight due to additional skylights in what would otherwise be a closed roof surface, but also from a greater footprint where you can stand. Anyone wanting to get through the winter in a good mood should not don a warm coat, but also think about larger windows.

Source: www.velux.de

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Other interesting facts

65% of those in Germany get too little daylight in the winter

Facts

The long dark days have an impact on the mind, and daylight is more important than ever.

Hamburg, November 2017. Winter is not the most popular of seasons in Germany. A study undertaken on behalf of Velux in December 2016 showed: The thing people miss the most people at this time of the year is daylight. So as to effectively counteract the bad vibes, it's all the more important to utilise the little daylight there is, and to design spaces to be as bright as possible.

When the temperatures fall in winter and the days grow shorter, our mood also takes a turn for the worse. But it’s not the cold which is the biggest problem: According to a December 2016 study conducted by the market research institute Kantar Emnid, on behalf of skylight manufacturer Velux, most Germans are bothered by a lack of daylight. 65% of respondents cited this point – way ahead of “low temperatures” (29%) and “thick clothes” (27%).


Too little daylight depresses one’s mood

By no later than January, looking out of your house at the grey weather worsens your mood, and the longing for sunshine intensifies. Daylight should not be underestimated as a factor of happiness. It has a unique blend of different colours, and thus promotes the formation of the “happy” hormone, serotonin: Our mood improves. Long periods of darkness can cause tiredness and bad moods. In the worse-case scenario, winter depression may occur, which has to be treated with light therapy. A better option here to guard against the winter months is by ensuring that the living areas in your house have sufficient daylight.


More light at home

The light intensity of an overcast sky is still three to four times as high as average room lighting. Which is why it’s all the more important to ensure that as much daylight as possible reaches your own four walls, where you of course spend more time in winter than in summer. Large windows are the best solution for this. If it's an attic room, Velux skylights in the sloped part of the roof can mean even more daylight coming into the rooms, as the incidence of light there is up to three times higher than for facade windows. In kids’ bedrooms, studies or living rooms on the floor just below the roof, they cause large amounts of daylight in particular to flood in, thus positively impacting the mood. So as to optimally support this effect occurring with large-scale window-based solutions, manufacturers such as Velux offer special lighting solutions, ranging from: a row of windows; an extension of the skylight in the form of a fixed-glazed additional element down to the ground; the combination of several skylights next to each other; through to a panorama solution similar to a dormer. In this last case, those using the attic room benefit now only from significantly more sunlight due to additional skylights in what would otherwise be a closed roof surface, but also from a greater footprint where you can stand. Anyone wanting to get through the winter in a good mood should not don a warm coat, but also think about larger windows.

Source: www.velux.de

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